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Vintage Indian décor has a timeless grace and presence that can transport one through history with feet firmly rooted in the now. An ever-green staple for Indian homes, hotels and other interior spaces, vintage décor’s classic appeal is rooted in its acknowledgment of heritage and culture. Artistic sensibilities are refined and regal, cultivated through centuries of stylistic creations and influences. Artworks that grace vintage spaces pay homage to many traditional and folk styles from across India, showcasing the country’s immense talent and diversity- inspired by the caves of Ajanta to the banks of Benaras, the royal courts of kings to the tribal art of village-folk. Read
Gond artist, Brij Bhushan Durve hails from the village of Dindori that lies on the idyllic banks of River Narmada in Madhya Pradesh. The Gond tribe is the largest Adivasi community in India and is native to the region where their traditional artform has existed for more than 1,000 years. They hold the belief that making and beholding a “good image” leads to good luck, and continue to decorate the walls and floors of their houses with traditional motifs and designs. Read
Early cave-paintings in France, Spain, Egypt, Somalia and closer to home in Madhya Pradesh share a common theme - they show primitive depictions of animals and nature that give us a glimpse into human history, some created more than 70,000 years ago. Read
The renowned American poet, E.E. Cummings compares Spring to a hand that arranges nature while the world looks on. Spring’s smiling and colourful symbols of renewal, rejuvenation, fertility and new beginnings paint a happy picture throughout nature and these symbols can be welcomed into our decor spaces through art and other elements. Read
Scandinavian Design is a design movement that emerged in the Nordic region in the 1950s. It is characterized by simplicity, minimalism and functionalism, and emphasized affordability and purpose in design. Artworks that are used in these spaces are influenced by these core tenets while contributing their own flavour to the space. Read

Around the world, through time and cultures, the tree has come to symbolize life, growth and the goodness of Nature. The series of paintings, “Elemental Spaces” by New Delhi-based artist Anjali Sapra germinated from her reflections on mythology; turning her thoughts into visual manifestations which are imbued with symbols, metaphors and elements of nature. Inspired by the techniques of impressionists and the Mughal miniaturists, Sapra celebrates the depth of the human experience and oneness with nature through her work.

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The Pantone Colour Institute recently announced “Greenery” as Colour of the Year 2017 following last year’s softer shades of blush “Rose Quartz” and a baby blue “Serenity”. The announcement explained, “Greenery is nature’s neutral. The more submerged people are in modern life, the greater their innate craving to immerse themselves in the physical beauty and inherent unity of the natural world”.

 

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Awe-inspiring and exuberant would perhaps be modest descriptors of the larger-than-life Maximalist style that is defined by excess. Art plays an integral part in the Maximalist Decor space, adding colours, patterns, layers and stories to an ambiance that is already bursting at the seams to enchant us with its many voices.

 

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Picasso preferred black and white. Do you remember Guernica? He believed that colours instigate sensual pleasure and monochrome demands an intellectual engagement. Shades of black and white are not only peaceful and timeless, but they have a certain stillness in them which begs the viewer to delve deeper. Here we have combined monochrome shades and art styles ranging from abstract to flora to showcase the power of black and white and how the shades effortlessly create relaxing and chic interior spaces.

 

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There is a long history of colours being associated with certain attributes and moods in different cultures. Phrases like “feeling blue”, “seeing red”,“green with envy”, and “in the pink of health” are ingrained in language and evoke a sense of immediate familiarity and recognition. The abstract artworks of Vatsala Menon, with their rich colours and titles like “Flamboyance” and “Deception” play on a similar level of using colours not just for their immediate visual effect but also as a means of portraying something more innate, more intangible.

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